Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: Shailendra Yashwant for Save the Children
Download from: familycarefirst.org
Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: KJ Borja for Save the Children
Photo by: Shailendra Yashwant for Save the Children
Photo by: Global Alliance for Children
Photo by: Global Alliance for Children

What is Family Care First?

In 2014, USAID launched Family Care First, a global initiative that seeks to uncover and advance transformational solutions that considerably reduce the number of children growing up outside of safe, nurturing, family-based care. In 2015, Cambodia was selected as the first site to pilot this approach. Today, Family Care First is an ever-growing partnership, comprised of global and community partners from all sectors committed to increasing the percentage of children living in safe, nurturing and family based care. Guided by the collective impact model for structured, multi-sector collaboration, FCF partners are working together to build both the trust and evidence required to more strategically and collectively contribute toward the shared vision of safe, nurturing family based care for every child in Cambodia.


The work of Family Care First is led by the following the following equally essential cross-sector working groups:

  • Technical Working Group for Implementation (TWGI): Comprised of 30-40 leaders of the non-profit, government, civic, business, academic and faith sectors, the TWGI is charged with both shaping and implementing FCFC’s framework for strategic action.
  • Thematic Sub-Groups (TSG): These smaller groups are organized for action around key areas of needed reform. The first four of these groups are working collaboratively to increase government capacity; strengthen the social service workforce; build pathways into family based care and address head on the market forces driving increases in residential care.
  • Knowledge Sharing Working Group (KSWG): Comprised of 10-15 international and local experts in research, data and evaluation, the KSWG is charged with both collecting and using data to inform the direction and assess the impact of FCFC.
  • Donor Steering Group (DSG): Comprised of 8-10 resource partners, the DSG is charged with providing overall strategic direction and mobilizing resources to meet FCFC identified resource needs.

Family Care First Cambodia’s strength lies in the commitment and support of its diverse membership and only collectively can its partners have the desired impact on the lives of children living without safe, nurturing family based care. For more information, please visit: www.familycarefirstcambodia.org


For more information, please visit: www.familycarefirstcambodia.org

Latest News

    Image 4

    Jul 20, 2017

    New TSG 5&6 Update

    Following the development of the first four Thematic Subgroups (TSGs), the Family Care First community in Cambodia has recently established two additional TSGs to proactively develop actions with research and learning opportunities ...

    read more
    Image 4

    Jul 07, 2017

    CCT Works with Communities to Keep Families Together

    Raising awareness about the importance of family-based care at a community level, and identifying the vulnerabilities and challenges that lead to family separation and the institutionalisation of children are key to keeping ...

    read more
    Image 4

    Jul 05, 2017

    Family and Child Vulnerability Index Progress

    While some information exists on the causes of family and child vulnerability and the drivers of child-family separation in Cambodia, this data has not been rigorously researched nor integrated into ...

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Increasing The Percentage of Children Living in Safe, Nurturing Family Care is a Complex Problem

Some social problems are easy to solve. The problem is well defined, the answer is known in advance, and a small number of stakeholders have the resources and authority needed to implement the solution. With complex problems, the answers are not yet known, and even if they were no single entity has both the resources and authority to bring about the necessary change. Increasing the percentage of children living in safe, nurturing family care is a complex problem. Achieving success will not only require more knowledge about the size and scope of the problem, but also the collaboration of multiple stakeholders toward a common goal.

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